What's On

Fri 05 Apr 2019

Gents Aintree Day

Featured Event

An afternoon of fantastic jump racing in the picturesque Durham surroundings.

Tue 23 Apr 2019

Spring Afternoon Racing

Tue 14 May 2019

Paxtons Season Finale

Head to Sedgefield for the final raceday of the 2018-19 National Hunt season, before a three month summer break.

Thu 29 Aug 2019

Roflow Ladies Evening

Featured Event

Head to Sedgefield as they support Roflow and the Great North Air Ambulance again this year.

Featuring the popular Best Dressed Lady Competition with a £500 cash prize up for grabs; as well as live entertainment after racing on the main outdoor stage.

Thu 05 Sep 2019

End of Summer Raceday

Head to Sedgefield as they celebrate the end of Summer with a day at the Races.

Tue 01 Oct 2019

Oktoberfest Raceday

Head to Sedgefield as they offer their own twist on Oktoberfest teamed with Racing.

Sun 20 Oct 2019

Durham National Raceday

Featured Event

The annual Durham International returns to Sedgefield on 21st October.

Thu 07 Nov 2019

Residents Raceday

Sedgefield are thrilled to be able to once again offer the Residents an exclusive offer for this afternoon racing fixture.

Not a TS21 resident? Not to worry, tickets are available to be purchased from £14 per person!

Thu 14 Nov 2019

Celebrating Construction Raceday

Head to Sedgefield for an Afternoon of racing.

Tue 26 Nov 2019

Winter Raceday

Head to Sedgefield for an Afternoon of racing.

Fri 06 Dec 2019

Christmas Jumper Raceday

Head to Sedgefield as they celebrate the countdown to Christmas.

Thu 26 Dec 2019

Boxing Day Raceday

Sedgefields biggest fixture of the calendar returns!

Enclosures

Where to be for the best views

Grandstand Enclosure

This is our main enclosure with access to restaurants, bars, retail outlets, bookmakers, tote betting pools.

Course Enclosure

This enclosure is situated within the centre of the racetrack and has a children’s play area. Food, drink and tote facilities will be available in the newly refurbished Centre Course building. However, there will be limited services on some dates with the enclosure remaining open with no reduction on the entry fee being offered on these date.

Racecourse Road, Sedgefield, Stockton-on-Tees, TS21 2HW
Larger map

Travel Information

How to find us

Directions

By Train

The nearest main line stations to Sedgefield are situated in Darlington and Durham, both are approximately twenty minutes away by car or taxi. Darlington Train Station (DAR) only 11 miles from Sedgefield Racecourse.

By Helicopter

Helicopter landing facilities are available at the course by prior permission.

By Car

Sedgefield is conveniently placed five minutes from Junction 60 off the A1(M), and is clearly signposted from there. The Racecourse lies just outside the village of Sedgefield, and is only twenty minutes from Teesside, Darlington and Durham city centre.

Parking

Parking is free of charge

Dress Codes

What to wear

No jogging bottoms, sports shorts, football/rugby shirts, skimpy tops or trainers. Smart jeans are acceptable.

Racecourse Information

The History

Ideally situated in the heart of County Durham, with easy access to the A1 and A19, the meeting room hire is perfectly located for your next meeting, training session or seminar.

Racing has been taking place at Sedgefield from around 1732, with the first recorded meetings in 1846. The course itself was part of the Sands Hall Estate, home of the Ord family and known as the Melton of the North.

In 1804 Ralph Lambton formed a club based at the Hardwicke Arms and Sedgefield became the headquarters of the Ralph Lambton Hunt, whose meetings had originally taken place at Lambton Park.

Ralph Lambton was an ancestor of the Earls of Durham, and among original members of the club were Ralph Brandling, then owner of Gosforth Park, and Robert Surtees, father of RS Surtees, the creator of Jorrocks.

By the turn of the century FJ Bayles described Sedgefield as, `one of the very finest of good, sound thickly herbaged turf, never known to become deep or heavy in the worst of weather. The surface of the gallop is smooth and as regular as a garden lawn. The fences are beautifully built of birch and not difficult to negotiate’.

By the turn of the century FJ Bayles described Sedgefield as, `one of the very finest of good, sound thickly herbaged turf, never known to become deep or heavy in the worst of weather. The surface of the gallop is smooth and as regular as a garden lawn. The fences are beautifully built of birch and not difficult to negotiate’.

The First World War saw the abandonment of racing in 1915 until its resumption in 1920. The post-war resumption was marred by the death of Richard Ord, the Squire of Sands Hall, who was owner of the Estate as well as a shrewd Jockey Club Handicapper.

The First World War saw the abandonment of racing in 1915 until its resumption in 1920. The post-war resumption was marred by the death of Richard Ord, the Squire of Sands Hall, who was owner of the Estate as well as a shrewd Jockey Club Handicapper.